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The Office of GOVERNOR LARRY HOGAN

Governor Hogan Announces Nine Judicial Appointments, Historic Nominees For Maryland’s Appellate Courts

First Hispanic Appointed to Maryland’s Court of Appeals
First African American, First Openly LGBTQ Person Named as Chief Judge of Court of Special Appeals
Chief Judge of Court of Special Appeals Elevated to Court of Appeals
Four Women Appointed to Baltimore City District Court

ANNAPOLIS, MD—Governor Larry Hogan today made nine judicial announcements, including two nominees for the Maryland Court of Appeals, one nominee for the Maryland Court of Special Appeals, and designation of a new chief judge of the Maryland Court of Special Appeals. The governor also made one appointment to the Washington County Circuit Court and four appointments to the Baltimore City District Court.

In total, Governor Hogan has now made seven appointments to the Court of Appeals—the state’s highest court.

“I am proud to appoint each of these distinguished and highly qualified individuals,” said Governor Hogan. “It is a top priority to ensure the composition of our courts reflect the great diversity of our state—these historic appointments deliver on that commitment.”

Angela M. Eaves, of Harford County, to Serve as Judge on the Court of Appeals

Currently the administrative judge for the Harford County Circuit Court, Judge Eaves has been appointed to the Court of Appeals to succeed Judge Robert N. McDonald upon his mandatory retirement in Feb. 2022. Eaves, whose mother is Panamanian and whose father is African American, is the first Hispanic appointed to Maryland’s appellate courts. This historic step follows the governor’s recent appointment of Maryland’s first Asian American appellate judge, Rosalyn Tang.

Since 2007, Eaves has served on the Harford County Circuit Court. Prior to her appointment to the Circuit Court, she served for seven years as an associate judge of the District Court for Harford County. Prior to her judicial service, Eaves was an assistant attorney general with the Office of the Attorney General, where she handled cases in the Correctional Litigation Division and on behalf of the Department of Human Resources. Earlier in her career, she was a staff attorney with the Maryland Legal Aid Bureau and an assistant city attorney for the City of Dallas. She received a bachelor’s and master’s degree in Public Affairs, and a J.D. from the University of Texas.

Eaves is also the first Harford County resident appointed to the Court of Appeals in more than 100 years. Read her full bio.

Matthew J. Fader, of Howard County, to Serve as Judge on the Court of Appeals

Judge Fader, currently the chief judge of the Court of Special Appeals, has been appointed to the Court of Appeals to succeed Judge Joseph M. Getty upon his mandatory retirement in April 2022.

Prior to his appointment to the Court of Special Appeals, Fader held various roles at the Office of the Attorney General, including chief of civil litigation. Prior to joining the Attorney General’s office, he was a partner at K&L Gates LLP, an international law firm, where he represented clients in commercial litigation in federal and state courts. Judge Fader served as a trial attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice from 1999 to 2002. He received his B.A. from the University of Virginia, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, and received his J.D. from Yale Law School, where was Senior Editor of the Yale Law Journal. Read his full bio.

Anne K. Albright, of Montgomery County, to serve as Judge on the Court of Special Appeals

Currently a judge on the Montgomery County Circuit Court, Judge Albright will be formally nominated to succeed Judge Fader upon his appointment to the Court of Appeals.

Prior to her appointment to the circuit court in 2012, Albright was a partner in the law firm of Albright & Rhodes, practicing family law, criminal defense, and immigration law. She began her career as a clerk for Judge Norman Ramsey on the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland, and then served for six years as a public defender. Albright received an A.B. from Dartmouth College and a J.D., cum laude, from the Georgetown University Law Center. Read her full bio.

E. Gregory Wells, of Calvert County, to Serve as Chief Judge of the Court of Special Appeals

Currently a judge on the Court of Special Appeals, Judge Wells will be designated as the new chief judge of that court, to succeed Chief Judge Fader upon his elevation to the Court of Appeals. Wells will be the first African American to serve as chief judge of the Court of Special Appeals, and the first openly LGBTQ person to serve as chief judge of either of Maryland’s appellate courts.

Wells has served on the Court of Special Appeals since 2019. Prior to his appointment to that court, he was a judge on the Circuit Court for Calvert County, a judge on the District Court of Maryland for Calvert, Charles, and St. Mary’s counties, and a master for domestic relations and juvenile causes for Calvert County. Wells also served as an assistant attorney general in the Criminal Appeals Division of the Office of the Attorney General and was the first African American to serve as Calvert County State’s Attorney. He received his B.A. from the College of William and Mary and his J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law. Read his full bio.

Joseph S. Michael has been appointed to the Circuit Court for Washington County. Michael, a 28-year veteran of the State’s Attorney’s office, is currently the deputy state’s attorney for Washington County, where he handles major felony cases. He has also maintained a part time private civil practice handling domestic cases and business matters. Michael received his B.A. from the University of Maryland, College Park and his J.D. from Washington and Lee University School of Law.

Tameika M. Lunn-Exinor has been appointed to the District Court of Maryland for Baltimore City. Lunn-Exinor is currently an administrative law judge at the Office of Administrative Hearings, a position she has held since 2010. Prior to being appointed an administrative law judge, she was an associate at law firms in Baltimore and Washington, D.C., focusing on civil litigation. She began her legal career as a clerk for Judge Bonita J. Dancy on the Baltimore City Circuit Court. Lunn-Exinor received a B.A. from Johns Hopkins University, a B.M. from the Peabody Institute at Johns Hopkins, and a J.D. from The George Washington University School of Law.

Lydie Essama Glynn has been appointed to the District Court of Maryland for Baltimore City. Glynn is the chief solicitor in the Litigation and Appeals Division of the Baltimore City Solicitor’s Office. She previously worked as an assistant attorney general in the Contract Litigation Unit at the Office of the Attorney General, as an assistant solicitor in the Litigation Division of the City Solicitor’s Office, and as an associate at a law firm. After law school, Glynn clerked for Judge Richard D. Bennett on the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland and Judge Peter W. Hall on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. She received her B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law. Glynn was born in Yaounde, Cameroon and speaks four languages.

Ana De la Hoz Hernandez has been appointed to the District Court of Maryland for Baltimore City. Hernandez has spent her legal career working at the Baltimore City Public Defender’s office, most recently as an assistant public defender in the Felony Trial Unit. The only native Spanish-speaker among Baltimore City’s public defenders, she is active in Hispanic and LGBTQ bar associations. Before becoming a lawyer, she worked as a special education teacher in a Miami-Dade County middle school. A native of Caracas, Venezuela, Hernandez received an A.A. from Florida International University, a B.A. from the University of Florida, and a J.D. from the University of Miami School of Law.

Theresa C. Morse has been appointed to the District Court of Maryland for Baltimore City.  Morse currently works as an assistant attorney general in the Organized Crime Unit of the Attorney General’s Criminal Division. Prior to joining the Attorney General’s office, Morse was a prosecutor in both the Anne Arundel County and Baltimore City State’s Attorney’s offices. After law school, she clerked for Judge Stephen Waldron on the Circuit Court for Harford County.  Morse received her B.A. from Boston College and her J.D. from the University of Maryland, Francis King Carey School of Law.

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